biomedicalephemera:

Other Types of Hair

Aside from scalp hair, humans have four other primary categories of hair:

Lanugo: This is a thick, downy hair, whose name comes from the Latin “lana”, meaning “wool”. It is present on all fetal humans between approximately 5 and 8 months gestation, and is shed several weeks prior to birth. When a baby is born prematurely, it often has much of its lanugo still on its body. The hair present on the bodies of full-term babies is the much finer and less-insulating vellus hair. Lanugo is also common in the malnourished, making it a key diagnostic in anorexia nervosa.

Vellus Hair: The fine, nearly-invisible, and ubiquitous hair that covers all humans on almost all parts of the body (aside from the lips, palms, and soles of the feet) develops shortly before birth, and continues to cover the parts of the body not covered by androgenic or terminal hair throughout life. Vellus hair is less than 2-4 mm long, and is not connected to a sebaceous gland. This hair also surrounds the scalp hair on the forehead, temples, and neck.

Androgenic Hair: Beginning in puberty, thick, bushy hair begins to develop in place of the vellus hair, in the pubic and axillary (armpit) regions of both genders. In addition, it also develops on the face, chest, and stomach, to varying degrees, depending upon sex and genetics. Androgenic hair follows the same growth cycle as scalp hair, but has a shorter anagen (growth) phase, and much longer telogen (resting) phase.

Terminal Hair: This is the second of the two types of androgen-influenced hair, but it is less “bushy” and dense than what is traditionally considered “androgenic hair”. It’s colloquially known as “body hair”, and develops during puberty, but does not include facial, chest, pubic, or axillary hair.

On the legs, arms, and back, thicker, stronger hair grows beneath the vellus hair of childhood and pushes it out, replacing it completely in some parts of the body, and only partially in other parts. In women, the area covered by terminal hair is much smaller, whereas some men (particularly those with Scandinavian, Mediterranean, or Aboriginal Australian/New Zealand backgrounds) can be up to 70% covered in thick, insulating hair. 

Images:

Triplets with Lanugo - Diseases of Infancy and Childhood. Henry Koplik, 1910.

Young Japanese boy, covered in vellus hair - despite the fact that it’s nearly invisible, each of us is covered with as many hairs per square inch as our apparently-hairier primate cousins! - Scenes From Every Land. Edited by Gilbert Grosvenor for National Geographic, 1907.

German boxer Max Schmeling, displaying highly developed terminal hair on the arms, as well as androgenic hair on the chest. Library of Congress digital archives. Original from 1938.

George F. Bond and Cyril Tuckfield after a rapid buoyant ascent of over 300 feet, after the USS Archerfish bottomed in 1959. Both men have significant terminal hair on the arms and legs.

Mark Twain shirtless, displaying androgenic hair - mustache and chest hair.

ladykaymd:

bklynmed:

nurse-blog:

Trauma is defined as physical injury or wound caused by external forces.

Common types:

  • Fall 38%
  • Motor vehicle traffic 29%
  • Firearm and cut/pierce 9.2%
  • Drowning 0.06%

Mechanisms of injury

  • Mechanical or kinetic energy
  • Thermal energy
  • Chemical energy
  • Electrical energy
  • Radiant energy
  • Oxygen deprivation that is a cause not an agent

GOLDEN HOUR: is a term used in trauma care that refers to the first hour following the initial traumatic injury. Patient survival rates increase with the proper care in the golden house

Trauma deaths that occur during the first 24 hours  are often the result of the “lethal triad” 

  • Acute coagulopathy
  • Acidosis
  • Hypothermia

Primary Survey

  • Airway
  • Breathing
  • Circulation
  • Disability
  • Expose

This format of assessment is ongoing throughout patient care, ensuring the priorities of assessment and continuous intervention are effective

Secondary Survey

  • Full set of vitals
  • Give comfort measures
  • History & Head to to assessment
  • Inspect posterior surfaces

I had never seen this past ABC!

(via aspiringdoctors)

fuckyeahnarcotics:

Based on the MRI, the patient was diagnosed with obstructive hydrocephalus, the magnetic resonance imaging scans, show enlargement of the third and lateral ventricles secondary to multiple posterior fossa metastases, which are narrowing the cerebral aqueduct, the fourth ventricle, and the fourth ventricular outflow tract, supratentorial metastasis is also noted, an MRI of the brain also shows multiple metastases, including a posterior fossa lesion causing obstructive hydrocephalus 

(via fuckyeahneurosurgery)

theloinlesslioness:

Finished as in no longer working on it yaaa
I’m glad I got this angle I really enjoyed it
It’s too bad I don’t get any more time though!!
Virginia told me to tag these as scientific illustration so plz dont kick me out

(via scientificillustration)

malformalady:

Sutures following tattoo excision surgery
Full set on my Blogspot

malformalady:

Sutures following tattoo excision surgery

Full set on my Blogspot

marywilliams:

Here’s a pretty quick sketch I recently did comparing the lynganeal nerve in humans and giraffes. I have a few more sketches to take care of and then I’ll hopefully have some Mandarin Ducks in progress this weekend. :)

marywilliams:

Here’s a pretty quick sketch I recently did comparing the lynganeal nerve in humans and giraffes. I have a few more sketches to take care of and then I’ll hopefully have some Mandarin Ducks in progress this weekend. :)

(via scientificillustration)

almondseed:

Bone neoplasms of the skull and spinal stenosis.

Chazal, Antoine Toussaint de, 1793-1854

Lithography, with hand-colouring

From: Anatomie pathologique du corps humain, 1829-1835

(Source: nervousglitch, via scientificillustration)

fuckyeahmedicalstuff:

Generalized tonic-clonic seizure.

fuckyeahmedicalstuff:

Generalized tonic-clonic seizure.

fuckyeahmedicalstuff:

Fronto-parietal cortical involvement in generalized tonic-clonic seizures, imaged by single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). Red represents relative increases in ictal compared to interictal CBF on SPECT scans, and green represents decreases. Despite the clinically generalized convulsions, focal relative signal increases are present in higher-order frontal and parietal association cortex, while many other brain regions are relatively spared. 

fuckyeahmedicalstuff:

Fronto-parietal cortical involvement in generalized tonic-clonic seizures, imaged by single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). Red represents relative increases in ictal compared to interictal CBF on SPECT scans, and green represents decreases. Despite the clinically generalized convulsions, focal relative signal increases are present in higher-order frontal and parietal association cortex, while many other brain regions are relatively spared. 

malformalady:

A red velvet brain cake for a wedding of two brain surgeon’s by cake artist Karen Portaleo

malformalady:

A red velvet brain cake for a wedding of two brain surgeon’s by cake artist Karen Portaleo

malformalady:

Sub-luxed mature cataract into anterior chamber
Photo credit: Dr. Philip Sidrian

malformalady:

Sub-luxed mature cataract into anterior chamber

Photo credit: Dr. Philip Sidrian

(via eyedefects)

period by KRUNK Interactive